Bayer emphasises the success of the Dutch chain cooperation

F14 L
Frank Terhorst, Hidde Boersma, Ernst van den Ende and Jelte van Kammen emphasise the opportunities of technology in the potato chain

At a mini congress, which focused on the opportunities of technology in the chain, Bayer informed nearly a hundred interested parties about the opportunities of cooperation for responsible food production and social acceptance.

During the meeting, the speakers emphasised the opportunities of technology in optimising the chain. According to Hidde Boersma, freelance scientific journalist and advocate of eco-modernism, it is important that agriculture takes place on the best land, by the best growers and with the latest techniques. This will increase yields and leave much more space for nature. In his view this is not only good for nature, but also helps the fast-growing world population to provide sufficient food. According to Frank Terhorst, Head of Crop Strategy & Portfolio Management at Bayer, new technologies will help meet future challenges. In order to optimise cultivation in this way, the collection and processing of data will become even more important. Ernst van den Ende, Director of the Plant Science Group at Wageningen University & Research, emphasises the importance of not making too many promises with the new technologies, such as CRISPR-Cas. ‘Technology is not the golden bullet, but a tool. We must be transparent, identify side effects and hold broad social discussions based on facts and not on emotions. Our vision is ‘to do more with less input, better products, and chain transparency.’ The idea that we, as a society, must jointly find answers to future issues is deeply rooted in our new strategic plan’, emphasises Van den Ende.

To read PotatoWorld magazine’s full article 
on Fruit Logistica, click here.   

Early growing areas see opportunities due to the withdrawal of CIPC

F13 L
Potato trading companies in early areas such as RO.GR.AN.srl are positioning themselves as suppliers of fresh produce.

One man’s loss is another man’s gain, is what you could say when you visit farms in the early growing areas in Italy, Spain and France. Due to the withdrawal of the Chlorpropham sprout inhibitor, it has become a challenge in Northern European countries to continue to supply high quality table potatoes long into the season. Companies in early areas are positioning themselves as suppliers of fresh produce.

In Sicily, Salvatore Milana has been growing and selling organic potatoes for many years which, until now, he has mainly exported to Germany, France and Austria, where they find their way to consumers via the Aldi and Edeka stores. He harvests the potatoes, mainly of the Nicola variety, from April to June. In the ‘heel of Italy’, Francesco Roman of the RO.GR.AN.srl company in Parabita trades around 4,000 tons of early potatoes every year. Important varieties in his range are Sieglinde, Annabelle, Nicola, Altesse and Vinessa. Normally, the growers in Puglia plant their potatoes in February and harvest them from May to August. He delivers the early potatoes partly under his own Baby Bear brand, but he can also supply bags of 25 kilograms. Customers include various European wholesalers, supermarkets in Poland such as Metro and Biedronka and the German Edeka supermarket. He says he’s ready for more demand from other countries.

On the French island of Noirmoutier, some 25 growers cultivate about 11,000 tons of early potatoes. In addition to fresh potatoes, the growers have made a name for themselves with their ‘zéro rédisu de pesticides’, which means there are no residues of plant protection chemicals in their harvested produce. The harvest starts in early April and continues until July 15. In addition to the old Sirtema variety and the exclusive, early La Bonnotte, other important varieties are Lady Christl, Laurette and Annalisa. Despite the fact that Commercial Manager Valéry Brechet expects the crop to expand, he reports that he’s ready to respond to the needs of buyers in other countries.

To read PotatoWorld magazine’s full article
 on Fruit Logistica, click here.   

Long storage important for variety introduction

F12 L
With the disappearance of CIPC, Jörg Eggers sees an increasing demand for varieties that can be stored for a long time.

Product marketing, new varieties, sustainable packaging and innovative techniques were the focus of attention at this year’s international Fruit Logistica trade fair in Berlin. During the fair, Team PotatoWorld talked with participating companies about their view on trends in the (packaging) market, sustainability and varieties.

At the German Europlant trading house from Lüneburg, the focus in the stand is on the wide range of varieties. In addition to this, the development of storage without CIPC is one of the most important topics at the stand, according to Managing Director Jörg Eggers. With the disappearance of CIPC, Eggers sees an increasing demand for varieties that can be stored for a long time. ‘With varieties such as Belana and Regina, we have strong varieties with a strong dormancy’, emphasises Eggers. ‘To solve this storage problem, we’re also seeing an increasing demand for early varieties such as Isabelia.’ He also notices an increasing demand from Central and Eastern Europe for table potato seed. ‘This year, we as Europlant are supplying larger quantities to Poland, where varieties such as Madeira, Milva, Regina and Belana are very popular. Eggers also tells us that Europlant has launched a new brand of table potatoes called Linella. The Kaufland supermarket chain sells low-carb potatoes under this brand. Eggers has high expectations of the Coronada variety in this new concept. In addition, he says that the potato as a product also offers many opportunities, it is gluten-free, Halal and can be distributed to a broad international target group at international trade fairs such as Fruit Logistica. Because Europlant has many contacts in China, Eggers regrets that, due to the Corona virus problems, many Chinese companies have stayed at home.

To read PotatoWorld magazine’s full article
 on Fruit Logistica, click here.   

Contributing to a sustainable future

F11 L
‘With our “Next Generation” varieties we contribute to a sustainable future’, says Wieger van der Werff.

Product marketing, new varieties, sustainable packaging and innovative techniques were the focus of attention at this year’s international Fruit Logistica trade fair in Berlin. During the fair, Team PotatoWorld talked with participating companies about their view on trends in the (packaging) market, sustainability and varieties.

During a well-attended meeting, Wieger van der Werff, Commercial Manager at Agrico in Emmeloord, underlined the growing interest in ‘Next Generation’ varieties. These are varieties with a broad Phytophthora resistance. The focus in the Agrico stand was on the Alouette, Levante, Twister, Twinner, Ardeche and Nofy varieties. Visitors were able to taste some of these in mini dishes. In his speech, Van der Werff points out that the demand for these varieties is high among growers in the Netherlands and that they have also become indispensable on supermarket shelves to meet the demand for sustainably-grown potatoes. ‘They are already cultivated in many places around the world and also prove their added value through good yields. In this way, we contribute to a sustainable future for our “Next Generation”’, says Van der Werff. He emphasises that Agrico has given its new 2020-2030 strategy this ‘title’ for a good reason. ‘Responsibility for people, planet and profit is very clearly anchored in it. An important goal is to make and keep potato cultivation more sustainable worldwide. And also to feed current and future generations through, among other things, secure yields and proper risk spreading of crop losses’, he explains.

To read PotatoWorld magazine’s full article
 on Fruit Logistica, click here.   

No more plastic in French supermarkets from 2021

F10 L
Laurent Dhalleine from Pom Alliance has observed a trend towards residue-free table potatoes.

Product marketing, new varieties, sustainable packaging and innovative techniques were the focus of attention at this year’s international Fruit Logistica trade fair in Berlin. During the fair, Team PotatoWorld talked with participating companies about their view on trends in the (packaging) market, sustainability and varieties.

According to Laurent Dhalleine of Pom Alliance, paper packaging will become more important in the future, because plastic packaging will no longer be permitted in supermarkets in France from 1 January 2022. ‘That’s the main reason why we’re now launching new paper packaging’, he says. In addition, the potato specialist has observed a trend towards residue-free table potatoes. To respond to this, Pom Alliance has joined the ‘nouveaux Champs’ collective, which aims to stimulate innovative potato cultivation and put table potatoes that are free from residues of crop protection chemicals on its shelves.

To read PotatoWorld magazine’s full article
 on Fruit Logistica, click here.   

One hundred percent paper

F9 L
The new Jasa packaging consists of 100 percent paper, Denise Bath and Piet Pannekeet explain.

Product marketing, new varieties, sustainable packaging and innovative techniques were the focus of attention at this year’s international Fruit Logistica trade fair in Berlin. During the fair, Team PotatoWorld talked with participating companies about their view on trends in the (packaging) market, sustainability and varieties.

The latest vertical filling machine of the Jasa company from Alkmaar ran with a completely new paper packaging, Bag-2-Paper. Piet Pannekeet and Denise Bath talk enthusiastically about their innovative product. ‘The packaging is made from 100 percent paper, without any plastic coating. It can contain a maximum of 2 kilograms of potatoes, is fastened without sealing and is 100 percent recyclable with your paper waste. Besides this, it looks really attractive’, Pannekeet says enthusiastically. Given the maximum speed of sixty packages per minute, the customers are not losing out on speed.

To read PotatoWorld magazine’s full article
 on Fruit Logistica, click here.   

Innovation Award nomination

F8 L
Justyna Konsek says that the nominated product is a certified compostable and environmentally-friendly, solvent-free packaging.

Product marketing, new varieties, sustainable packaging and innovative techniques were the focus of attention at this year’s international Fruit Logistica trade fair in Berlin. During the fair, Team PotatoWorld talked with participating companies about their view on trends in the (packaging) market, sustainability and varieties.

Partly on account of the exhibition organisation’s focus on sustainability, the Silbo Company, with its Bobasket compostable potato packaging, has been nominated for the 2020 Fruit Logistica Innovation Award. Justyna Konsek tells us that the plastic of the packaging is made of corn starch. She says that the new product is a certified compostable and environmentally-friendly, solvent-free packaging. With the help of flexo technology, the water-based links can be printed on a wide range of plastics. The attractive packaging can be used on most vertical packaging machines. The company ultimately received the silver medal from the Innovation Award jury for this innovation.

To read PotatoWorld magazine’s full article
 on Fruit Logistica, click here.   

Making sustainable packaging real

F7 L
To make the sustainability of packaging real, NNZ has developed fact-based packaging, say Alies Padding (r) and Len Boot

Product marketing, new varieties, sustainable packaging and innovative techniques were the focus of attention at this year’s international Fruit Logistica trade fair in Berlin. During the fair, Team PotatoWorld talked with participating companies about their view on trends in the (packaging) market, sustainability and varieties.

At NNZ, supplier of packaging to the entire potato chain, they’ve developed a method to make the sustainability of packaging real. ‘We call it fact-based packaging’, say Alies Padding, Innovation Manager at NNZ and General Manager Len Boot. ‘We need to balance three factors when it comes to reconsidering the choice of packaging. We’re looking for a balance between market impact, use of raw materials and footprint,’ Padding explains. As to market value, NNZ does not only consider the wishes of the consumer, but also the visibility, waste, impact on the environment, recyclability and, of course, the market. Important factors to consider here are the footprint, the use of reusable materials, recyclability, and market impact and, naturally, the costs. By testing a packaging for these properties, a business can make a fact-based choice for its packaging material. Apart from this discussion about understanding the impact of packaging on the market and the environment, Padding believes that it is very important that the packaging protects the product. ‘Good packaging reduces food waste, because it reduces damage. If you want to grow 1 kilogram of fresh product you need 200 litres of water, for example. When packaging ensures a 10 percent loss reduction, it already helps the environment enormously. Compared to waste, the packaging footprint is often relatively small.’

To read PotatoWorld magazine’s full article
 on Fruit Logistica, click here.   

The hospitality industry inspires the supermarket

F5 L
According to Michiel Meijering and Danya Smits, consumers are increasingly looking for luxury and convenience.

Product marketing, new varieties, sustainable packaging and innovative techniques were the focus of attention at this year’s international Fruit Logistica trade fair in Berlin. During the fair, Team PotatoWorld talked with participating companies about their view on trends in the (packaging) market, sustainability and varieties.

According to Danya Smits, responsible for marketing, communication and product development at Landjuweel of Uithuizermeeden, consumers are increasingly looking for luxury and convenience. She points out that the younger generation no longer buy 10 kg bags of table potatoes, but small packages for a meal for two people. To make things easier for the consumer, Landjuweel offers the Jazzy variety in a special microwave packaging, in which the potatoes are ready in 7 minutes. ‘As a result, last year’s sales of small-packaged potatoes up to 1.5 kg increased by 9 percent. The sales of larger packages of 4 kg and more fell by 9 percent’, adds account manager Michel Meijering. ‘When we develop products, we also look at the hospitality industry. We’ve noticed that what you see in the hospitality industry you also see in the supermarket. An example is the potato twister. When people know such products well enough, it’s time to start developing family packaging and making the translation to the consumer. We’ve done this now by making a potato twister package for the supermarkets. We expect to be able to sell this twister around the holidays, with a retail value of between 4 and 5 euros. Keywords here are speed, convenience, special presentation and, of course, taste. That fits in with the general trends. What we see is that people have less time and only decide what they’re going to eat once they’re in the shop. That means you have to do more to convince the customer. You have to surprise them on the shop floor. Your communication on the packaging is very important. You don’t just buy a bag of potatoes, it’s the basis for a dish’, Smits concludes.

To read PotatoWorld magazine’s full article
 on Fruit Logistica, click he
re.   

Continue to develop new concepts

F4 L
‘We need to stay ahead and develop new concepts’, Stan de Jager says.

Product marketing, new varieties, sustainable packaging and innovative techniques were the focus of attention at this year’s international Fruit Logistica trade fair in Berlin. During the fair, Team PotatoWorld talked with participating companies about their view on trends in the (packaging) market, sustainability and varieties.

At Jansen-Dongen in Tilburg, Stan de Jager tells us that they carry a total package of fruit and vegetables including an increasing percentage of organic produce in their subsidiary BioFresh. The potato remains an essential product in this range. An important trend is that the company is continuously innovating in varieties and packaging. ‘We need to stay ahead and develop new concepts’, he says. ‘An example is our salty potatoes from the island of Texel’, he explains. ‘A type of crop that will become increasingly important world-wide due to the land becoming more saline.’ Another trend that De Jager sees, are the box meals. ‘We supply the HelloFresh company in the Netherlands and Germany with our potatoes. We’ve developed a new packaging that’s recyclable and looks attractive. Those are fantastic projects to make potatoes a little bit sexier’, he says enthusiastically.

To read PotatoWorld magazine’s full article
 on Fruit Logistica, click he
re.   

Check out our calendar for upcoming events

Click here